2022 Conference Presentations & Handouts

2022 IHD Evidence for Success Hybrid Disability Conference logo

Conference Program

Monday, June 20, 2022

Monday’s program consists of the general opening session and four 75-minute concurrent breakout sessions where attendees can choose the session that interests them most.

If the presenter(s) provided the conference organizers with presentation materials, those are found at the end of the session description. Presentation materials are the intellectual property of the presenter(s) and they are solely responsible for them, including their accessibility.

NOTE: Indicates that the session is presented both IN-PERSON and VIRTUALLY.

8:00 am – 9:00 am: REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST

9:00 am – 9:15 am: WELCOME REMARKS * (Grand Ballroom)

9:15 am – 10:15 am: CONFERENCE OPENING SPEAKERS, featuring Floyd Alvin Galloway and Eric Reed * (Grand Ballroom)

#101: JUNETEENTH: Frederick Douglass and the Battle for Human Rights *

In an increasing number of Black communities Juneteenth has replaced the 4th of July as its Emancipation Day, its Freedom Day, and all that comes with the visualization of that ever dreamy reality.

The freedom fighting ex-slave, Frederick Douglass, was one who fought until his last breath for the emancipation of Blacks in America. Not a one dimensional human, he also supported women rights.

Historian and Human Rights advocate, Floyd Galloway, will discuss the history of Juneteenth, explain its significance to the Black community, illustrate the ways in which Frederick Douglass served as an impetus to the Civil and Human Rights movements, and explain how Douglass’ mission continues to intersect with the continued struggles of today’s human rights challenges, including those experienced by persons with disabilities.

This general (plenary) session will also feature the voice of Eric Reed, retired police officer and Buffalo Soldier historian.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will leave with an expanded awareness of the history of Juneteenth Federal Holiday as presented through the oration and activism of Frederick Douglass.
  • Attendees will increase their knowledge of the mission and purpose of the Civil and Human Rights movements through contemporary times and examine how these movements inform Disability Rights advocacy and activism.
  • Attendees will identify ways to incorporate an intersectional framework for advancing diversity work in their fields or careers.

10:15 am – 10:45 am: BREAK & EXHIBIT HALL (Grand Ballroom)

10:45am – 12:00 pm: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#201: Adapted Video Gaming & The AzTAP Gaming Clinic – Guffey (Community Living/Inclusion) *

Home based video gaming systems have been available since the early 1980’s. However, the early gaming systems had no accessibility options or features for persons with disabilities. Over time, as the games have become more sophisticated, they have become even more inaccessible. It has only been in the last decade that significant advancements have been made in the accessibility of these gaming systems, the games themselves, and in the development of adaptive access technology.

This presentation will provide a foundation overview of some current commercially available adapted gaming hardware. Additionally, participants will also be introduced a new AzTAP initiative to launch a new adapted gaming clinic in the summer of 2022. Come learn how your clients can use this new AzTAP service to accomplish their video gaming goals, and view selections from a series of instructional/informational videos on adapted gaming topics that will be made available the AzTAP website.

Learning Objectives:

  • Presentation attendees will develop a basic understanding of available adapted gaming equipment.
  • Presentation attendees will learn about the structure of the AzTAP adapted gaming clinic and the services it will provide.
  • Presentation attendees will learn how to refer their clients with gaming goals / needs to the AzTAP adapted gaming clinic.

Handout: Presentation #201

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#202: DYNA STEM: Discovering the Neurodiversity Advantage in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM) – Jenson (Education/Post Secondary) *

Neurodiversity is diversity in terms of cognitive difference and includes conditions such as autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, and learning disabilities. The STEM fields need neurodivergent thinkers who bring creativity and unconventional solutions to the world’s STEM challenges. This session will focus on the ways neurodiverse students are well-suited for STEM and strategies for supporting their STEM learning

Handout: Presentation #202

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#203: Building Community through Collaborations: Exploring Potential Partnerships to Expand Resources and Improve Access for All – Press/Wagoner/Bries (Education/Post-Secondary; Employment/Transition)

The Peoria School District has been working to build relationships within our community. Come learn about the collaborative projects we have been doing and how your district might do some of the same things. Examples include partnering with local engineering students to make keyguards for AAC users, 3D printed symbols for visually impaired students, and printing large poster sized core boards for every self-contained classroom in the district! Further collaboration includes a project working with the city parks and recreation department to improve access to parks throughout Peoria for individuals with mobility or sensory impairments. This session will focus on how these projects came to fruition with the intention of helping other districts work to replicate these projects in their own community.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will identify different professionals/administrators/educators within their community that can help with collaborative projects.
  • Participants will discuss strategies for how to replicate relevant aspects in their setting.
  • Participants will learn about different technologies for using technology/resources to collaborate for students with disabilities.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora A) and will NOT be recorded.

#204: Communication….. Low Tech, High Tech, and In-Between! – Buti (Education/K-12; Augmentative Communication)

Communication needs vary for all students. There are so many different options out there. Where do we even start? We will explore many options and what some of the benefits are from low-tech to high-tech systems. No matter which system you use, always aim high! Presume competence! The process of total communication and aided language stimulation are important components to successfully increase any child’s communication. Let’s take a look at practical implementation strategies.

Learning Objectives:

  • The participants will be able to describe how to support the use of aided language stimulation.
  • The participants will be able to describe how to support Total Communication.
  • The participants will be able to describe multiple examples of both low-tech and high tec communication systems, why someone might choose one over the other, and some benefits of each.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora B) and will NOT be recorded.

#205: Project SCOPE: Supporting Children of the Opioid Epidemic – Clancey (Early Intervention)

Project SCOPE, Supporting Children of the Opioid Epidemic, is a national initiative to train interdisciplinary teams on emerging knowledge and evidence-based practices in screening, monitoring and collaborative care for children impacted by Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS), or who are suspected of being impacted by opioid use, trauma, or related exposure. Important information from this training initiative will be presented. In addition, findings from a qualitative interviews completed with attendees regarding wether the information was helpful and if so how they used the information in their work with young children and families.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how the Opioid epidemic has impacted families and children here in Arizona.
  • Gain insight into how children and families impacted by the opioid epidemic can be supported.
  • Learn how attendees of the Project SCOPE training initiatives used the information to support families.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora C) only and will NOT be recorded.

#206: Accessible Phones for the Blind – Rivas Parker (Deaf-Hard of Hearing/Blind-Visually Impaired)

This session is intended to expose the attendees to the assorted options of accessible phones, for people who are blind, available in the market. This will include smart phones, regular cell phones and land line phones. There will be also a presentation of the features and accessories for the phone as well as some available apps that make these devices to be more than just a phone.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to name at least one device from each of the three categories of phones.
  • Participants will be able to name at least three unique features of at least one phone from each of the three categories of phones.
  • Participants will be able to describe the process to loan the phones for a 14-day trial from AzTAP.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora D) only and will NOT be recorded.


12:00 pm – 1:00 pm: LUNCH, FIRESIDE PANEL DISCUSSION & Raffle Drawing (Grand Ballroom)

Fireside Panel Discussion

Attendees are invited to engage in an informal fireside chat during their lunch hour on Monday, June 18th. Reynaldo Fowler, from the Arizona Center for Disability Law and co-founder of the African Americans Conference on Disabilities, will be joined by IHD’s Assistant Director of Academic Program, Sakénya McDonald. The chat will highlight the ways in which African American community leaders, self-advocates, and family members are improving access, attitudes, and inclusion for individuals with disabilities across the state of Arizona.

1:30 pm – 5:00 pm: EXHIBIT HALL: Open to the Community


1:00 pm – 2:15 pm: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#301: Technology to Support Working Memory: Externalize, Organize, Conceptualize – Haven (Education/K-12; Education/Post-Secondary) *

Working memory is the mind’s desktop, and a critical part of executive functioning. In this mental workspace, one integrates inputs from short-term memory with information retrieved from long-term memory and manipulates them to aid in expressing ideas, making decisions, and solving problems. Working memory also helps organize new knowledge for long-term storage.

In this workshop, AT Consultant Shelley Haven will show how technology can support working memory challenges in three ways:

  • Externalize – outsource parts of the working memory process into the physical world (paper or digital) to reduce cognitive load
  • Organize ideas in ways that highlight whole-part relationships and connections to improve comprehension
  • Conceptualize – create organizational frameworks that help form generalized concepts and prepare information for encoding into long-term memory.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain what “working memory” is, and how it is used during common academic tasks such as reading, writing, math, taking notes, studying, planning, problem solving, etc.
  • Provide examples of how different kinds of organizational frameworks (outlines, mind maps, diagrams, tables, flow charts, timelines, task apps, etc.) can support or enhance various kinds of learning.
  • Describe how organized frameworks can help individuals learn new concepts, retain new knowledge, and retrieve information more efficiently.

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#302: Disability and COVID Vaccines – a Panel Discussion – Rice/Engelthaler/Gomez/Thorne (Community Living/Inclusion) *

The goal of the panel is to assemble a group of developmental pediatricians, medical professionals, and community leaders to serve as a trusted source of information for people in the disability community making decisions about COVID vaccines and boosters. We are hopeful that this event will be an opportunity for people with disabilities and their loved ones to have their questions and concerns fielded by a group of knowledgeable and compassionate voices with experience and credentials to give their words more weight.

Learning Objectives:

  • Audience will understand the science of the mRNA vaccines
  • Audience will know that the vaccines do not alter genetics of vaccinated individuals
  • Audience will know how the vaccines have impacted the disability population in clinical, social, and personal spheres through the experiences shared by the panelists

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#303: Pathways to Further Education, Employment and Independent Living through Benefits Management – Rivera/Reed (Employment/Transition)

Parents of youth with disabilities as well as individuals with disabilities struggle with the thought of returning to work. Many do not realize that benefits do not end; actually, they just shift. There are numerous work incentives that can assist youth and adults achieve financial wellness and independent living. This presentation breaks the barriers to employment by discussing the untapped resources that can support your decision to take that first step. It will include much needed information regarding Social Security rules, Social Security benefits, healthcare, and employment. We will provide information on how you can gain free access a Community Work Incentives Coordinator that will work with you one-on one to ensure that you are taking advantage of the resources available without compromising your benefits.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about savings programs that will allow one to save earned income and not count as resources against one’s Social Security cash benefits while working.
  • Work incentives and resources that can be used by transitioning youth to assist with post-secondary education and entering the work force.
  • How to retain healthcare benefits when one has returned to work.
  • Learn about work incentives and safety nets that can be used when considering employment without losing one’s benefits.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora A) only and will NOT be recorded.

#304: Giving Students a VOICE as They Acquire Critical Social Skills – Smith/Mosher/Carreon (Education/K-12)

Social emotional learning presents challenges for a variety of learners, including those with identified disabilities. This interactive presentation offers an opportunity to experience an innovative virtual reality (VR) application to address social skills for middle school students. Attendees will leave understanding the benefits of VR technology utilizing innovative devices as well as devices for VR they have that can support the diverse learners in the classroom. Based on a thorough development process, participants will learn about 10 unique social skill domains that include 140 interactive scenarios from which students engage, experience, and are assessed to further develop a knowledge and understanding of social skills applicable to the school, classroom, and home environment.

Key Learning Outcomes:

  • Participants will understand the previous literature defining and supporting the use of VR in the classroom to support students with disabilities.
  • Participants will demonstrate understanding and comfort in utilizing and implementing the VOISS VR social skill application.
  • Participants will experience guided access and exploration of the VOISS application and VOISS advisor to support personalization of learning for teachers and their students with specific social skill competency needs.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora B) only and will NOT be recorded.

#305: Always Assume Competence: Eliminating Stigma and Cultivating Opportunities Through Personal Storytelling – Brown (Community Living/Inclusion; Augmentative Communication)

This presentation will include examples and suggestions for using storytelling techniques to demonstrate one’s competence and abilities to those who may have misconceptions about the correlations between physical limitations and cognitive awareness. It will also include personal stories from my journey as Ms. Wheelchair Arizona, as “Always Assume Competence” is my platform. Participants will be able to see video interviews and answer discussion questions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Audience members will learn the importance of assuming competence regardless of a person’s limitations.
  • People with disabilities will have creative ideas for demonstrating their competence to non-disabled people.
  • People should be able to recognize the need for a change in attitude and approach to communicating with others who have various disabilities.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora C) only and will NOT be recorded.

#306: Opening Up the Lines of Communication for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing – Plummer/Lervik (Deaf-Hard of Hearing/Blind-Visually Impaired)

Communication is a two-way street and we all have the opportunity to learn about the technology solutions that pave the way for improved communication. Individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing encounter a wide range of situations that impact communication including new and ongoing barriers related to the pandemic.

Technology solutions have had to advance and evolve during the past year as methods for interaction have swiftly changed. This session will provide attendees with current solutions to communication for individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing in the areas of work, education, home, and within the community. Session time will be split between sharing information, device demonstration, and exploring practical uses through case studies. Join us to learn about all the latest solutions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe and demonstrate three technology advances with hearing aids.
  • Describe and demonstrate at least one accessibility solution for each of the following: school, work, home, and community access.
  • Describe and demonstrate three apps that create access for hearing loss on mobile technology devices.

Handout: Presentation #306

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora D) and will NOT be recorded.

2:30 pm – 3:45 pm: CONCURRENT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#401: Changing the Game: Coaching in Tele-AAC – Anderson/Stampfel (Augmentative Communication) *

As the NAU IHD AAC Evaluation and Training Program has rapidly expanded their tele-AAC service provision, our therapists’ coaching skills have become critical for family success. In practice, many therapists use coaching styles and interventions that share a common focus on collaborative, family-centered practice and use of adult learning theory, but come from a variety of coaching models. Coaching in its various forms may help families achieve their goals more effectively than what is traditionally thought of as training alone, but what is considered best practice? This session will provide an introduction to coaching as a critical skill in tele-AAC provision. It will provide information to help therapists improve their competency and confidence in using a coaching approach in their tele-AAC practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe directive, collaborative, and problem-solving strategies for tele-AAC coaching.
  • Describe the difference between training and coaching and their associated outcomes.
  • Utilize current literature on coaching to apply to their practice.

Handout: Presentation #401

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#402: Plain Language: How to Write for Audiences with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities – Monteleone (Community Living/Inclusion) *

Whether it’s plain language or Easy Read, simplified writing makes texts readable for a wide variety of audiences, including people with intellectual and learning disabilities, English language learners, and those with limited access to education. Characterized by active tense, short sentences, and familiar vocabulary, plain language is an essential tool for communicating in a way that guarantees you will be understood. In this workshop, we will:

  • Define plain language and differentiate its various uses;
  • Discuss the importance of readability, particularly for people with intellectual disabilities, who are often excluded based on reading ability;
  • Learn the basic characteristics of plain language;
  • Practice several plain language translations.

Attendees will leave equipped with resources to begin writing in plain language in their organizations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop a working understanding of the definitions of and potential uses for plain language, easy read, and other kinds of accessible writing.
  • Become familiar with the common characteristics of plain language.
  • Learn and practice the steps one would take to develop a plain language document.

Handouts: Presentation #402

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#403: Current issues in Higher Education and Technology Access – Axelrod (Education/Post-Secondary)

Post-secondary education is becoming more reliant on technology for all forms of transactions and participation. However, the technology marketplace is not keeping pace and supplying accessible options for these activities. This session will explore the most common issues and how they are currently being addressed on college and university campuses.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify current accessibility barriers in higher education related to technology.
  • Participants will be able to identify current practices for addressing accessibility barriers in higher education.
  • Participants will be understand the current scope of technology use on campuses across the country.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora A) only and will NOT be recorded.

#404: Road to Independence: Assistive Technology in Transition Planning for Students with Complex Support Needs – Hegebush/Egan/Livesay/Wooten-LaFranier (Education/K-12)

Assistive Technology (AT) devices and services can improve the ability of people with disabilities to participate independently in post-school settings, including employment and education. There are many possibilities when it comes to AT, but there is no “one size fits all.” Therefore, AT options must be individualized and based on a student’s personal needs and preferences. It is during their high school years that students with disabilities need to explore, use, and become proficient with the AT tools that will benefit them in their post-school lives. If AT is included in the transition section of their IEPs and used to support their measurable postsecondary goals, students with disabilities will be more prepared for success when they move on to the next phase of life.

Key Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand how to apply the SETT process to the transition portion of the IEP.
  • Develop a positive attitude towards adding assessment information into the transition portion of the IEP.
  • Increase knowledge of assessments that they are aware of to use to assess AT in all three areas of the transition section.

Handout: Presentation #404

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora B) only and will NOT be recorded.

#405: The Power of Positives: Implementing Pyramid Model in Early Childhood – Callahan (Early Intervention)

We will discuss the components of the Pyramid Model of positive behavior supports and the challenges and rewards of promoting a positive classroom culture through the implementation of the model in nine early childhood classrooms in northern Arizona. We will share emerging data that suggest the model is having a positive effect on all of the children in the participating classrooms.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how to apply the SETT process to the transition portion of the IEP.
  • Develop a positive attitude towards adding assessment information into the transition portion of the IEP.
  • Increase knowledge of assessments that they are aware of to use to assess AT in all three areas of the transition section.

Handout: Presentation #405

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora C) only and will NOT be recorded.

#406: Universal Design… It’s Never Too Late – Odell/Stokes (Community Living/Inclusion)

It is never too late to apply the principles of Universal Design (UD) in your work! Ideally, it’s best when you apply the principles from the beginning of a project, use them throughout, and test them with users who have disabilities. But…it is never too late. This session will share the seven Universal Design principles to increase access, inclusion, and usability whenever it is applied.

This session will show UD’s use in various disciplines. Using these principles in architecture, communications, programs, services, policies, products, and environments increases usability and effectiveness.

Leave with very practical tips and tools on how you can make modifications to your environment towards greater levels of access and inclusion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the seven Universal Design principles and how they contribute to accessibility standards to create access, inclusion, and usability across a wide range of design disciplines.
  • Understand that applying Universal Design (UD) principles in communications, programs, services, products, and the built environment makes them more usable.
  • Experience exercises in applying the Universal Design Principles in different scenarios and the value of user testing.
  • Identify at least 5 products that can help increase levels of access and inclusion in your current environment.

Handout: Presentation #406

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora D) only and will NOT be recorded.

4:00 pm – 5:15 pm: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#501: Adaptive Sports in Arizona – The Power of Partnerships – Shoaff/LaZear/Hansen/Hughes/Rodriguez/Davenport (Community Inclusion) *

This is a panel discussion about how we can benefit the community by working together. There are a number of great adaptive sport organizations in Arizona and throughout the country. This panel will highlight a number of programs throughout Arizona and how you can use them as a resource to benefit your clientele. They will also discuss how they collaborate on a regular basis to bring more options to the end user.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify additional resources in the community specific to adaptive sports.
  • Participants will be able to identify the benefits of participation of adaptive sports for individuals with disabilities.
  • Participants will be educated and be able to identify two new adaptive sports that are offered in their community.

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#502: Culturally Responsive Tribal VR Services Models – Gaseoma/Sakiestewa (Employment/Transition) *

The AIVRTTAC holistic service delivery model for AIVRS projects is culture-based, respectful, and responsive to the diverse backgrounds, values, customs, lifestyles, beliefs, practices, and needs of tribal individuals with disabilities seeking gainful employment. The AIVRTTAC model focuses on five domains affecting tribal members with disabilities: 1) physical, 2) mental, 3) spiritual, 4) emotional, and 5) environmental. Recognizing that a person’s cultural background affects how they communicate and make decisions, the Hopi VR Project used the analogy of Hopi dry farming to illustrate the VR process from application to successful closure. These two models offer promising ways for tribal VR projects to include cultural perspectives that align with standard VR practices and help tribal participants become financially self-sufficient and contributing members of their respective tribal nations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn about the diverse composition of tribal VR projects serving tribal members with disabilities.
  • Participants will learn the distinction between tribal VR project and state VR agency service models.
  • Participants will discover inclusion of culturally responsive practices reflecting tribal cultural backgrounds.

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#503: Self-Advocacy and Self-Determination in College Transition: Student Panel Discussion – Tosca/Musgrove/Garciaguirre (Education/Post-Secondary)

As youth prepare to exit high school, they frequently consider their life choices which may include attending college. Research proves that students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities are often excluded from receiving the college transition support offered to their peers and may feel uncertain about pursuing higher education. Additionally, students with disabilities that self-determine and self-advocate are more likely to earn a meaningful credential and enter into integrated career opportunities. This panel presentation will feature the voices of college students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities from diverse backgrounds. At the end of this presentation, attendees will leave with a holistic understanding of the college transition processes, what students feel they need to succeed in college, and what actions lead to opportunities for inclusive college experiences

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the SIP-C program, its mission, its distinct zones across Northern Arizona, and the support services provided to students in each zone.
  • Participants will recognize the unique experiences of students with I/DD navigating college transition, including the barriers they face and their personal successes, to increase awareness and visibility of disability voices in higher education institutions
  • Participants will identify the benefits of post-secondary transition for students with I/DD, specifically in their development of self-advocacy, self-determination, autonomy, and independent living skills

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora A) only and will NOT be recorded.

#504: Technology to Support Planning and Productivity: On Time, On Task, and In Control – Haven (Education/K-12; Education/Post-Secondary; Employment/Transition)

Keeping track of responsibilities and planning how to complete them are deceptively simple tasks that often seem insurmountable for individuals with weak working memory, planning, and time management skills. Students may rely on adults as their “executive functions”; employees may be viewed as lazy or under-productive.

In this workshop, AT Consultant Shelley Haven will show how to assemble a system of tools and associated strategies to reliably:
– Keep track of responsibilities
– Plan and prioritize steps to complete tasks
– Get started on a task or project
– Manage time and effort through completion.

Though the concepts discussed apply to all ages, the tools will focus primarily on the needs of students in middle school through college and adults.

Learning Objectives:

  • Name the five parts of an effective system for managing tasks.
  • Describe at least two kinds of task management frameworks and provide an example of each.
  • Explain why it’s important to couple tools with strategies to build executive functioning skills.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora B) only and will NOT be recorded.

#505: Access Across the Day – Customizing AAC to Support Complex Communication Needs – Gibson/Stampfel/Madgelano (Augmentative Communication) (Vendor)

Individuals with diverse or complex communication needs, including cortical visual impairment (CVI), dual sensory impairment/deaf blindness and/or physical/motor needs may have initial inconsistent access to communication and/or literacy technology. Adaptations and modifications are available for success and individualization.

This panel presentation will include a shared family member, provider (SLP) and trainer/consultant perspective on practical options for implementation of AAC with 1) inclusion of a support community (school, community, family) and (2) implementation for successful communication in daily contexts. (3) options and indications for application of existing evidence based intervention and (4) A sample model of AAC use with consideration for sensory, hearing, vision and motor implementation will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify 3 or more team members and their role in utilizing AAC design or modification to better support team collaboration and implementation.
  • List 2-3 rationales for considering an alternate/augmentative method of communication.
  • Describe 3 features of AAC to consider for a user with multiple sensory impairment.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora C) only and will NOT be recorded.

#506: SEL Interventions Delivered Through Virtual Technology: What’s Free and Out There Now – Smith/Mosher/Carreon (Community living/Inclusion; Education/K-12)

This session presents a mixed-methods study on immersive and non-immersive virtual reality (VR) for social and emotional learning (SEL) development. A free VR platform for SEL will be presented as well as a discussion of other such platforms available to educators, clinicians, and parents. Participants will have the opportunity to explore the VR scenarios as well as the free teacher assistance website with lesson plans, videos, and scenarios to help educators generalize instruction into the needed environment. Finally, the relationship between middle school students’ social skill acquisition and preferences will be discussed. Participants will leave with knowledge of VR and methods for implementing successful social skill interventions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will develop an understanding of the specific social skills within expressive communication (EC) necessary for middle school student success and effectively implement three of these skills within evidence-based practices (social narratives and video modeling) within virtual technology.
  • Participants will discuss five lessons learned through this study about technology-delivered interventions and student preferences to support their students’ social skill development.
  • Participants will experience guided access and exploration of two social skill instructional scenarios within the VOISS technology to understand better technology’s role in providing direct and observational social skill instruction.

This session will be presented in-person (Sonora D) only and will NOT be recorded.


5:15 pm – 6:00 pm: NETWORKING RECEPTION & Raffle Drawing (Grand Ballroom)

6:30 pm – 7:30 pm: TOUR at ABILITY360 (optional) – Ability360 Adaptive Recreation Facility


Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Tuesday’s program consists of four 75-minute concurrent breakout sessions where attendees can choose the session that interests them most, as well as two general sessions (at lunch and at the end of the day). Click on the plus sign (+) to read the session description.

If the presenter(s) provided the conference organizers with presentation materials, those are found at the end of the session description. Presentation materials are the intellectual property of the presenter(s) and they are solely responsible for them, including their accessibility.

NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both IN-PERSON and VIRTUALLY.

7:00 am – 8:00 am: BREAKFAST & EXHIBIT HALL (Grand Ballroom)

8:00 am – 9:15 am: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#601: AT for Vocational Rehabilitation Clients who are also attending post-secondary programs or are employed – Fischer/Lovato (Employment/Transition) *

This session will provide information on what Assistive Technology devices and services can be provided by Arizona’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program. It will describe the process of requesting and obtaining AT devices and services; such as evaluating the need for devices and services that will be provided, training on the use the device/devices, paying for the them, and determining appropriate use of the AT. The session will also cover who is responsible for providing AT when the VR client attends a post-secondary school or is employed, including information and tips for reasonable accommodation requests for AT. Participants will also learn about their appeals rights if VR denies an AT service or device, and complaint rights in post-secondary and employment settings.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will acquire a general knowledge of AT services available to them through the State’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program.
  • VR clients also attending post-secondary programs will learn who (and under what circumstances) is responsible for providing AT devices and services needed for equal access to the program.
  • VR clients who are also working will learn about the employer’s legal responsibility to provide AT devices/services and when VR may be required to provide AT devices/services.

Handout: Presentation #601

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#602: Lessons Learned and Initial Findings from the Diné Parents Taking Action Pilot Project – Running Bear/Lindly (Early Intervention) *

Profound racial and ethnic disparities exist in autism services access for children who are Latinx, African American or black, and American Indian or Alaska Native (AI/AN). Yet little research has sought to understand the experiences of Indigenous parents raising autistic children including barriers to accessing services. Moreover, few parent education and training programs currently exist for Indigenous families of autistic children. This session will describe a collaborative, community-based pilot project that is underway to adapt and test the Parents Taking Action (PTA) program for Diné (Navajo) families of autistic children. The PTA program was originally developed for Latinx families of autistic children and has been shown to be efficacious in improving maternal confidence and use of evidence-based autism practices, as well as child social communication.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare preliminary study findings regarding Diné parent/guardian experiences raising autistic children to past study findings regarding the experiences of parents from other ethnic groups raising autistic children.
  • Describe the key components of the Parents Taking Action program.
  • Discuss common approaches to adapting the Parents Taking Action program for different cultural groups.

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#603: AZ ABLE Accounts: Protect Benefits and Build Financial Security! – Chipley (Community Living/Inclusion)

Millions of individuals with disabilities and their families depend on a wide variety of public benefits for income, health care, food and housing assistance. Unfortunately, these individuals are ineligible for benefits if they have more than $2,000 cash savings and retirement funds. However, opening an AZ ABLE account at the low cost of $25 will not only protect your benefits, but also build savings and financial security!

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the AZ ABLE Program and ABLE as a whole.
  • Learn about the benefits of opening an ABLE account.
  • Learn about eligibility and the enrollment process.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora A) and will NOT be recorded.

#604: Tech4Rec – Egan/Galbraith/Wooten-LaFranier/Keeney (Education/K-12)

IDEA mandates that students with disabilities have the ability “to be involved in and make progress in the general curriculum and to participate in extracurricular and other nonacademic activities.” Participation in extracurricular activities, hobbies, and recreational activities can have powerful and positive impacts on the mental and physical health of students with disabilities and can lead to increased opportunities to develop relationships and experience more active and fulfilling lives at school and in the community. In this session, we will demonstrate a wide range of assistive technology tools for extra-curricular activities and recreation, including sports, art, music, cooking, play, and other hobbies.

Learning Objectives:

  • Expand consideration of AT to include “non-academic” domains for students in the K-12 setting.
  • List the positive outcomes when students with disabilities participate in extra-curricular and recreational activities
  • Expand knowledge of the range of AT tools that enable SWD to participate in extra-curricular and recreational activities

Handout: Presentation #604

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora B) and will NOT be recorded.

#605: Obtaining a Speech Generating Device Through the Health Plans – McLaws/Greenwood (Augmentative Communication)

We would like to discuss the process for obtaining a speech generating device through the Arizona Medicaid plans (Mercy Care and United Health Care Community Plan). In general, we would like families, educators, and therapists to know what this process looks like to ensure that members with disabilities are receiving the services that they need. Services, meaning, how to receive an evaluation for a speech generating device, how to receive a device, and how to receive training on the device. We often find that families do not understand how to go about doing this because they have received inaccurate information from various sources.

Learning Objectives:

  • Families, therapists, and educators will understand how to go about receiving an evaluation for a speech generating device.
  • Because of this knowledge, members with disabilities will receive the services and supports that they need.
  • Because of this knowledge, families/therapists/educators will facilitate more evaluations for speech generating devices because they know how to proceed. In addition, they can share this knowledge with others to enable more members to receive needed speech generating devices.

Handouts: Presentation #605, Therapy One Referral Form

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora C) and will NOT be recorded.

#606: Hearing Aids and Assistive Technology: Challenges for those with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss – Thompson (Deaf-Hard of Hearing/Blind-Visually Impaired)

Hearing aids and assistive listening devices (ALD) are never straight forward for those with Combined Vision and Hearing Loss (CVHL). Often the focus is on communication only not on the other demands placed on the hearing aids and the ALD. It is critical to discuss about the care of devices, orientation and mobility skills, and accessing the computer. Hearing aids have Bluetooth capabilities, but how effective is that with computers, tablets, and smartphones. What do we need to consider with streamers to make up for the limitations with hearing aids. It is important to explore the technology capabilities and limitations to better prepare those with CVHL to have an informed conversation with their audiologist.

Learning Objectives:

  • Challenges for those with CVHL; how does hearing loss impact daily living
  • The different types of hearing aids and ALD
  • The functional capabilities and limitations of technology for the CVHL population

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora D) and will NOT be recorded.

9:30 am – 10:45 am: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#701: Stepping Up – Young Adult Program for AAC Users – Odom/Legaspi/Predebon (Augmentative Communication) (Vendor) *

Creating engaging, motivating activities for teens and young adults who use AAC can be easy and fun with the many lesson plans, activities, and resources on the AAC Language Lab. During this interactive session, you will learn how to use lesson plans and activities specifically designed for this population. Help your teen using AAC transition from school to work or adult programming by improving communication, social skills, computer access, and empowerment using these materials. This class is designed for speech-language, educators, and anyone supporting young adults using AAC.

Learning Objectives:

  • List lesson plans and activities on the AAC Language Lab that can be used to engage adolescents and young adults who use AAC
  • Summarize the 5 components of the BRICS program
  • Describe the benefits of and process for creating a Dream Board with adolescents and young adults

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#702: What Works in Transition: Recommendations from the People and Communities Providing Transition Services in Arizona – Parent-Johnson/Duncan (Employment/Transition) *

What Works in Transition will discuss a statewide assessment of the current state of transition services in Arizona conducted by the Sonoran UCEDD in 2020-2021 to identify current exemplary practices, areas of need, and recommendations for improving post-school employment rates for youth with disabilities. This session will discuss the strategies, recommendations, and lessons learned that were discovered in conducting this research, including experiences and suggestions of teachers, administrators, and community members engaged in providing transition services. Templates for informing community mapping and assessment of best practices in relation to peer school programs will be provided. Participants will be invited to share their perspectives on strategies presented along with any experiences and examples of strategies that they have found to be effective in their own communities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify exemplary practices used in transition services around the state, along with strategies to adopt them in new schools and communities.
  • Participants will be able to describe current areas of need in transition services in the state, along with ways to potentially address them.
  • Participants will be able understand the unique demands specific regional and geographical factors play in school and school communities transition services.

Handouts: Presentation #702

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#703: The Power of Communication and Disability Representation – Ladau (Community Living/Inclusion)

Even informed advocates and allies can still fall into the trap of speaking either for or over disabled people rather than centering their authentic stories and experiences. This conversational breakout session will address ways those with disabilities have reclaimed their power through language, communication, and media after historically being excluded from advocacy efforts. Together, we will explore how to ensure our work uplifts intersectional disability perspectives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Stronger understanding of the impacts of language we use in reference to disability
  • Stronger understanding of how to think critically about media representation of disability
  • Stronger understanding of how to center and uplift disability perspectives

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora A) and will NOT be recorded.

#704: Teach Everyone How to Fish for Tools… – Leibowitz/Danielson (Education/K-12; Education/Post-Secondary; Employment/Transition)

Frequently, teachers already have the resources they require for their students. All devices have built-in features students have access to within the school system or their personal technology tool set. However, staff believe that the AT Specialist should introduce the tool to the kid because they are the experts, not them.

This session will demonstrate that building capacity to access AT will strengthen success. The teacher is often familiar with the student’s strengths and challenges and may not need the support to choose tools that students will need. Building capacity will increase independence to implement AT sooner, thereby helping students meet goals in a timely fashion.

This presentation explains how expanding everyone’s understanding of how to investigate and use tools may help improve AT success.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to empower educators, support staff, and parents
  • Learn how to research an Assistive Technology or Accessibility tool to meet a learning need
  • Build capacity and collaboration

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora B) and will NOT be recorded.

#705: Gathering Provider Perspectives to Evaluate the Use of the PLAY Project with Traditionally Underserved Populations – Palm (Early Intervention)

The PLAY Project autism intervention is a parent-mediated model that has been implemented on a large scale, but its effectiveness with traditionally underserved families has not been evaluated. This study aims to obtain PLAY Project Consultants’ (PPCs’) perspectives on using PLAY with children with or at-risk for autism whose families are rural-dwelling, culturally diverse, and/or low-resourced (“traditionally underserved families”). Furthermore, the study aims to examine provider perspectives on barriers and facilitators to determine what adaptations could be made when using PLAY to facilitate its implementation and increase its effectiveness for traditionally underserved populations. Results of the study may be helpful for serving the broader population of children with autism and their families and may also be transferable to a variety of autism interventions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain knowledge about barriers and facilitators that influence outcomes of interventions for traditionally underserved families (TUF), as reported in the literature.
  • Participants will learn about the theoretical foundations used to develop a study of provider perspectives of working with TUF.
  • Participants will learn about the development of mixed-methods study to investigate barriers, facilitators, and adaptations for an autism intervention.

Handout: Presentation #705

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora C) and will NOT be recorded.

#706: Creating an AT Flow in and through School Activities into Life Beyond Schooling – Heipp (Cross Categorical) (Vendor)

Assistive Technology is often approached in a “specific device for a specific application” mindset as one works within the school setting and into the workplace environment. With the arrival of technologies that can address multiple activities, one can create an inclusive environment with devices that will also provide support for the lifetime of the individual. By equipping inclusive environments with these devices, one also begins to de-sensitize neuro-typical individuals to the use of these; making them as transparent as the need to use glasses or contacts. We will be approaching low/no tech to high tech devices within the areas of access, AAC, Functional Skills, sensory needs, and transitioning that can work to provide the foundation for inclusivity as well as universal design within all environments.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify specific categories for AT usage within both the classroom and workplace environments
  • Interact with devices that can provide the transition between these environments in an inclusive manner
  • Mentally create approaches which can be used directly in their environments with the devices they already have available to them

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora D) and will NOT be recorded.

10:45 am – 11:15 am: BREAK & EXHIBIT HALL (Grand Ballroom)

11:15 pm – 12:30 pm: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: * Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#801: Using Telepresence Robots for Disability Access in Hybrid Classes – Lee/Gode (Education/K-12; Education/Post-Secondary) *

This presentation will share ways in which the Cal Poly Disability Resource Center has used a telepresence robot called the Kubi to enable disabled students to participate remotely in hybrid classrooms during the pandemic. The presenters will explain their rationale for purchasing multiple Kubi telepresence robots and how they determined eligibility for using the Kubi as a classroom accommodation for remote students. Attendees will hear from the remote students, their student proxies, and their instructors about their experiences using the Kubi. The presenters will share tips and strategies that they have learned while implementing the Kubi telepresence robots on their campus. Selected attendees will have an opportunity to remotely control one of the Cal Poly Kubi robots during the presentation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to name at least 3 advantages of using telepresence robots over other more traditional tech options in hybrid settings (e.g. classroom, office).
  • Attendees will learn at least 3 tips/strategies for effectively implementing a telepresence robot program for students with disabilities.
  • Attendees will learn about 3 challenges that can arise when using telepresence robots in a hybrid classroom and how to overcome them.

Handout: Presentation #801

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#802: Reasonable Accommodations: Your rights and how to fight for them – Dietrich/Lovato/Colavito (Employment/Transition) *

Reasonable Accommodations in employment. What are they? What counts as ‘reasonable’? Who can get them? How do you ask for them? What do you do if your employer says ‘no’. Learn about your rights under the ADA, what to do before you ask for a reasonable accommodation, how to ask, what your next steps are after you request a reasonable accommodation, and what resources are available to help you identify the accommodations you need, protect your rights, and get the support you need to keep your job.

Learning Objectives:

  • The obligations of the employers under the Americans with Disabilities Act regarding the provision of reasonable accommodations
  • The rights of employees regarding reasonable accommodations
  • Tips and strategies for employees to identify effective accommodations and obtain those accommodations

Handouts: Presentation #802

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#803: Join us for the PIT: the Power of Inclusive Thinking – Nunez/Livesay (Employment/Transition)

Interested in how understanding both the Arizona job market and the employment status of Arizona youth with disabilities can support you in writing effective secondary transition plans? Join us for a conversation about a career exploration strategy intended to support you in identifying appropriate employment goals for all students. The presentation will focus on the importance and value behind the age-appropriate transition assessment data collected and the knowledge, skills, and abilities of a job description. You are invited to unite with the many professionals who currently use the Power of Inclusive Thinking (PIT) to support students with disabilities identify their career goals. The question is… will you accept the challenge of joining us in the PIT?

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will gain an understanding of Arizona’s post-school outcomes for youth with disabilities.
  • Participants will be introduced to the Department of Labor’s employment/ unemployment rates for youth with disabilities, including insight into Arizona industries demonstrating growth.
  • Participants will expand their capacity to identify appropriate employment measurable postsecondary goals using employment first and career exploration strategies.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora A) and will NOT be recorded.

#804: Flexibility is Not Just Good in the Gym: Rigid Made Flexible the Autism Way – Buti (Education/K-12)

Many students with Autism are known to have rigid thoughts or actions due to cognitive rigidity. With the ability to be flexible and mentally adapt to new demands, one can be more successful socially, academically, behaviorally, and vocationally. It is important to help those with autism manage their inner inflexibilities to reduce their stress and tolerate change. In this session, I will share strategies and supports to help your students go from rigid to flexible. Let’s stretch our supports to help our students learn to be more flexible!

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify what rigid thinking looks like with students with autism.
  • Identify a minimum of 3 strategies learned today to help a student with autism become more flexible.
  • Identify where to locate and or how to create supports to reduce anxiety in students with autism.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora B) and will NOT be recorded.

#805: Caution Signs for the Intersection of AT and Ethics – Plummer (Cross Categorical)

Assistive technology solutions and strategies for school, work, home, and life often resemble a road way with many lanes, stop signs, pot holes and intersections. This session will drive us through the process of identifying technology solutions and strategies plus implementing those recommendations. The various roads taken can lead to ethical obstacles which may or may not always be clearly visible. We can apply an ethical lens to the entire process; from decision making models to the CRC Code of Ethics.

Topics covered will include assessments, purchasing, and training as they related to boundaries, due diligence, and consumer support and instruction. Primarily a lecture format, case examples will be used to facilitate discussions and decision making using the CRC Code of Ethics.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to list three ethical best practices for assistive technology assessments.
  • Participants will be able to list three ethical best practices for assistive technology for vendors and trainers.
  • Participants will apply AT service provision criteria and how they are covered by the CRC Code of Ethics

Handouts: Presentation #805

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora C) and will NOT be recorded.

#806: Assistive Listening Systems: Not only for those living with hearing loss! – Kaufmann (Community Living/Inclusion; Deaf/Hard of Hearing & Blind-Visually Impaired) (Vendor)

Assistive listening systems are best known for the life-changing effects they have for those living with hearing loss. In this presentation we will explore the benefits of this technology for those living with other disabilities and those living with no disability at all. Drawing on ten years of installation experience, this presentation will include practical examples of how assistive listening brings extraordinary benefit to the classroom, the workplace, and even the festival environment. It will focus on the application of the technology for those who are both neurodiverse and those who are neurotypical, with an opportunity for delegates to experience firsthand the incredible power of assistive listening technologies.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will leave with a comprehensive understanding of the applications for Assistive Listening Systems where no hearing loss presents.
  • Participants will be able to describe in detail the life changing effects of assistive listening systems across the life span and without prejudice to disability.
  • Participants will leave with a first-hand experience of a variety of assistive listening systems and as a result, how they should be used in venues that they frequent.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora D) and will NOT be recorded.

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm: LUNCH, FEDERAL ADMINISTRATION FOR COMMUNITY LIVING (ACL) PRESENTATION & Raffle Drawing (Grand Ballroom)

Moving Forward from Challenging Times – McFadden/Brandt *

Erica McFadden and Jack Brandt of the Federal Administration of Community Living will review accomplishments and share trends in the disability field.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm: EXHIBIT HALL (Grand Ballroom)

2:00 pm – 3:15 pm: CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

(NOTE: Indicates that the session is presented both in-person and virtually and will be recorded. All other sessions are presented in-person only and will not be recorded.)

#901: Document Accessibility in Higher Education – Spencer (Community Living/Inclusion; Education/Post Secondary) *

This session addresses Accessible Information and Communication Technology and is presented by the leadership of AbleDocs, a leadering organization providing document accessibility products and services. More details about the presentation are coming shortly.

During this session, attendees will learn about the nuances of document accessibility in higher education, get a better understanding of their document accessibility toolkit, along with how to develop a campus-wide document accessibility strategy.

Learning Objectives:

  • Garner a better understanding of document accessibility within the higher education space.
  • Learn how to create and use tools to create a document accessibility toolkit.
  • Learn to build a sustainable campus-wide document accessibility strategy.

This session will be in-person (Kiva A) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#902: Social/Emotional Competency Instruction and Practice – Noonan (Education/K-12; Employment/Transition) *

Participants will explore the College and Career Competency Framework through focusing on one of three competencies (i.e., self-regulation, assertiveness and self-efficacy) for self-assessment, building knowledge and brainstorming instruction. Aligned with the CASEL indicators, these competencies can be explicitly taught, practiced and reinforced in every classroom, Pre-K through 12 to promote social emotional growth. Participants will complete a set of small group activities where they reflect on current practice, review SEL curriculum parts, learn foundational concepts, and view examples of instructional practices in various classroom settings. Participants will leave with a clear understanding of how readily available supports through Project EASEL such as online professional development and coaching opportunities can be utilized for embedding SEL in daily instruction across school settings.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will know how to access free resources.
  • Participants will consider how competency instruction could impact their student learning.
  • Participants will identify next steps to implementation.

This session will be in-person (Kiva B) and live-streamed virtually. The presentation will also be recorded and available for on-demand viewing for a limited time after the conference (for registered and paid conference participants ONLY).

#903: Imagining a Good Life – Murrell (Employment/Transition)

Imagining a Good Life: Families of youth and young adults who have disabilities and are transitioning into the adult world seeking out independent living, employment, education, relationships, recreation, and community connections. Learn about setting a vision for a great life, understanding expectations, core concepts for a great life, what does success look like and addressing concerns.

Learning Objectives:

  • Setting a Vision for a Great Life
  • Understanding Expectations
  • Core Concepts of a Great Life (Education,Employment,Independent Living,Community Connection,Personal Choice)
  • What does Success look like?
  • Addressing Concerns

Handout: Presentation #903

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora A) and will NOT be recorded.

#904: Diving Into the AAC Language Lab – Odom/Legaspi/Predebon (Augmentative Communication) (Vendor)

The AAC Language Lab has a wealth of resources for individuals using AAC and staff who support them. In this interactive session, you will learn how to use tools to assess and monitor language levels of those using AAC. We’ll dive in to individual lesson plans so you can see how easy it is to develop instruction with these ready-to-go materials and activities for speaking, reading, writing, and more. Do you need custom supports? Learn how to create smart charts on any online platform with our smart chart generator. Come explore all this plus bonus resources, blogs and our awesome Ambassadors. This class is designed for educators, classroom staff, speech-language pathologists and anyone interested in using fun, engaging activities to support individuals using AAC.

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess and monitor the language level of individuals using AAC with the Language Screener and Language Stages
  • Develop intervention based on specific language objectives using a lesson plan with various activities for speaking, reading, writing and more
  • Create support materials for AAC communicators using the smart chart generator

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora B) and will NOT be recorded.

#905: Strengthening Connections: Early Intervention and Beyond – Granger/Samsel/Palm/Clancey (Early Intervention)

The foundation of early intervention is building a strong connections with the family. The Growing in Beauty Partnership Program is based out of NAU IHD and serves families in early intervention on the Navajo Nation. Therapists will share considerations including: cultural humility, coaching model, and empowering the family to advocate for their child and recognize their unique strengths.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand how cultural humility can strengthen connections.
  • Participants will be able to describe the coaching model.
  • Participants will learn how early intervention and later educational settings can support families in being an active participant in their child’s development.

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora C) and will NOT be recorded.

#906: Sun Sounds of Arizona 2022 – Wright (Deaf-Hard of Hearing/Blind-Visually Impaired) (Older Adults)

Sun Sounds of Arizona provides audio access to information to people who cannot read print because they have a disability. The creative use of technology and talent ensures that every disabled person has the opportunity to access the current and local information necessary to a self-directed, productive life. There is no charge for any of the Sun Sounds services. All services are FREE!

Those services include 24 hour programs, special radios, Amazon Dots and an annual Broadcast Schedule in Large Print, Braille, CD, and on-line.

Learning Objectives:

  • The participants will receive a hands on demonstration and use of the Sun Sounds special radio and other listening devices.
  • The participants will have the opportunity to live stream a Sun Sounds program from their iphones and other electronic devices.
  • The participants will have the opportunity to register as Sun Sounds listeners at the presentation venue.

Handout: Presentation #906

This session will be presented in-person only (Sonora D) and will NOT be recorded.

3:15 pm – 4:15 pm: CLOSING SPEAKER, Emily Ladau * (Grand Ballroom)

#1001: Shifting Perspectives: How the COVID-19 Pandemic Continues to Teach Us Lessons About Disability *

As we continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, disabled people are still in a position where we need to convince the world that our lives are worth protecting and saving. However, the pandemic has also brought with it crucial lessons on how to make the world more truly inclusive and accessible for everyone. In this fireside chat, disability rights activist and author Emily Ladau will be in conversation with IHD-AzUCD’s Dr. Ronda Jenson, followed by a Q&A with the audience, focusing on the impacts (both positive and negative) of the pandemic on the disability community and how we can mindfully move ahead.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How to improve inclusivity and accessibility in a world still affected by COVID-19
  • How to foster self-determination in a world still affected by COVID-19
  • How to center physical and mental health for the disability community in a world still affected by COVID-19

4:15 pm – 4:30 pm: CLOSING & Grand Prize Drawings (Grand Ballroom)


We appreciate the support of our conference co-sponsors

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