Tag: Mental Health/Trauma Informed Care

Incorporating Mental Health Supports and Assistive Technology for Our Individuals in All Settings

In creating this session, the presenter has utilized a number of evidence-based approaches. First, formal research studies have provided the foundation for both understanding the increased anxiety levels in all individuals today as well as the application of needs which have shifted since the inclusion of virtual connectivity. Anxiety research includes published studies on both students and adults, e.g. Wu, Kuan, et al. (2023), Haliburton, et al (2021), and others.

The focus on both activities for de-escalation has come from direct interviews with experts as well as anecdotal observations in actual settings. For assistive technology, the research around it has provided a foundation for working with groups to directly identify strengths and weaknesses or various devices as well as the ability to distinguish which tools can be most beneficial. The presenter will interact with the attendees to pursue the lines of questioning to be addressed before trials might begin on appropriate assistive technology.

Because of this combination of published research, expert interviews, and anecdotal field experiences without bias toward any specific approach or device, attendees will be able to make more informed decisions on the best supports for their individuals as there is not a “one-size-fits-all” approach which works.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will learn and try multiple ways to calm themselves down in an effort to be able to share that with their students or consumers.
2. Participants will engage with various forms of assistive technology to enhance what they are able to do in classroom and workplace settings.
3. Participants will discuss the various tools and applications that they currently use and how those could be adapted into other settings or activities.

Developing the Self in a Community through Poetry and AI

While there is little research available at this time on using AI with individuals with intellectual disabilities, the presenters do have experience using AI with both university-level classrooms and current research with individuals with intellectual disabilities. In these situations, the participants have learned how to be thoughtful and intentional about their use of this technology and see it as a tool rather than a replacement for their own creativity, while also embracing the dynamics of the language, images, and concepts that it may provide. In their work, Ippolito, Yuan, Coenen, and Burnam (2022) followed professional creative writers in their use of a specific AI tool, Wordcraft, and found that these particular authors used it primarily as a search tool rather than a crafting tool, but would also ask it to describe particular scenes (a memorable moment, for instance) or used it to help with editing. Our experiences, however, have asked students to use their chosen AI tools to help them develop a more robust language usage and visualization of their work, while also using it to create deeper meaning to their own work.

Key Learning Outcomes

1) Participants in this presentation will learn skills to integrate artificial intelligence into their practice.
2) Participants in this presentation will learn about different artificial intelligence tools that will support individuals in developing language, descriptive skills, and images that are representative of their ideas.
3) Participants in this presentation will have the opportunity to see how artificial intelligence tools were used with individuals to create poetry and visualizations of that poetry to enhance their individual expression, connections to one another, and to a greater community.

Using the Trauma-Informed Positive Education Model in Secondary Special Education Classrooms

The research used to support this presentation is a combination of empirical articles and research and the results of my dissertation. My dissertation was a qualitative descriptive design study that provided teachers with information on the Trauma-Informed Positive Education model created by Brunzell and his team of researchers in Australia. My study provided information on how to effectively implement these strategies within a secondary special education classroom as well as ways that school administration can support this implementation.

Key Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will learn and practice strategies to support students with self-regulation, forming positive relationships with others, and developing a positive mindset.
2. Participants will gain knowledge of what is needed to effectively implement these strategies with students in their classroom.
3. Participants will create an action plan of what they will do to begin to implement the strategies to support students in their classroom.

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